A Moving Target

My cynical side expects some idiot to try crawling under there to get in the store…

West Virginia is coal mining country isn’t it?

We have had similar happen here where they have developed over coal mines that payed out decades ago and finally collapsed… in some cases the mine shut down that long ago that they didn’t know that there were old shafts and tunnels beneath them.

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I don’t get how that is possible.

The subsoil investigation (it is mandatory for large buildings in the US as well, isn’t it?) should have uncovered such a structural problem of the ground.

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@Aginor, as I recall you are not American. And even if you are or you know the country well, you are likely less than familiar with West Virginia. Imagine a green Kazakhstan (well any -stan) with the top half of all mountains lopped off.

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OMG that was savage! :joy:

So yeah, that was my German moment of the week I guess. :smiley:

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FACTS!

Though I have to chuckle when anyone in the US who lives outside the intermountain-west says they have “mountains”. Them’s hills, son.

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Our claim to altitude in Texas, is we are WAY hillier than Oklahoma next door.

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I don’t recall enforcement being particularly good the 26 years I lived there. Seems it’s getting worse any time I see the news or discussion board threads like this.

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Almost universally on private buildings things like soil density etc. are going to be the responsibility of the builder and their engineers to certify. Even then if they come back and say the numbers are bad, the client can sign a release and push on with the project.

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Oh. Wow, that would be highly illegal here. They would never get the building permit. Especially not if there are other buildings downhill.

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Also less Oklahomans, too.

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This is Hillierious.

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So…yeah…

https://www.geoengineer.org/news/landslide-causes-large-part-of-swedish-motorway-to-collapse

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What the literal ****? Do they have to inform employees that they work in a non-compliant building?

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I’m assuming there is probably a level for soil density/compaction etc. where they wouldn’t issue an occupancy permit, but I suspect that’s based more on the fact you couldn’t even get the slab to stabilize prior to putting up walls. Beyond that, it’s all going to be private litigation against the construction company, owner of the building, and any contractors if something happens.

They’re all going to be hiring lawyers to point fingers at each other. Unless there is some kind of gross negligence by the operator, ie requiring employee’s to be stocking shelves while half the building is teetering on collapse, the odds of anything besides settling out of court are very low. Probably some regulatory fines, but no criminal liability.

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