Bit of a shock

Just sat here, watching you-tube when a massive boom shakes the house, so I stick my head outside to see everyone else looking out, after some internet fu from the daughters, apparently we have just been overflown by a couple of Typhoons heading to an “incident” at Stansted airport… bloody hell it was loud.

8 Likes

Yeah we are not used to it anymore.
When a few years ago two German Typhoons in the Stuttgart area launched to intercept a non-communicating airliner, lots of people called the police asking if someone had detonated bombs.

I took my family to the Biggen Hill Air Fair a couple of years back. One of the displays was a Typhoon and Spitfire in a joint display. Even with ear defenders neither of my daughter’s could cope with the noise of the typhoon - we ended up sitting out the last half of that display in the car. :persevere:

3 Likes

BBC News - Essex ‘explosion’ was ‘sonic boom’ caused by military aircraft

3 Likes

As a resident of a former Soviet Bloc Country, I remember back in the day before the fall of iron curtain, Su-22s have flown more liberally over residential areas. One day I was sitting in my house when I heard loud bang that made the windows shake - it was a flight of Fitters going for a target range at pretty low altitude at 1+ Mach. It looked awesome but was frightening as hell for a young kid.

10 Likes

I will add mine…

Circa 1972, four and a half years old. A child plays in the ample garden of an Ethiopian Air Force bungalow on the shores of Lake Hora, Debre Zeyit, generally very happy with life. And why not? It was evening, the light was becoming rosy, and the two fish eagles that had an aerie in a massively tall tree were arriving and departing to the lake in turns. The child’s mother and father were standing together, chatting, under the extended eaves that formed the veranda of the bungalow, and watching, presumably, that the child did not venture to the brush at the far end of the garden. A few days before the Ethiopian gardener had apparently seen and reported the presence of a black mamba in that vicinity.

It was, of course, yours truly. My preceding memories are crystal clear to date, as a result of what was to come. A sound, like I had never even considered might exist, apparently all the peals of thunder put together combined with uncountable breaking dishes, tumbling cutlery, and a shrill whistle undertone, came from out of the tranquility, with no warning, and louder than anything ever heard before.

I ran. Whatever toy I had was dropped without thought, and I ran across the garden to the veranda, as fast as my legs could carry me, while the rumbling lingered like crumbling masonry.

My parents did not seem bothered. My father was laughing, even, so I stopped short of running into the bungalow to hide.

“Did the F-5 frighten you?”

I learned to say “Effive”, that day. It was the monster of my nightmares. :slight_smile:

16 Likes

Air Force brat here. I grew up next to several flight lines. One was Kadena AFB in the early 80’s. F-15’s with the ZZ tail code climbing hard into the night sky on full burner. BUFF’s lumbering along, F-16’s darting off like startled birds. All are small fish compared to the SR-71. If you want to wake up every single person on an island, an SR-71 takeoff in the middle of the night will do that. Watching them blast into the sky was the closest thing a young boy will ever see that will compare to sci-fi books and movies. Occasionally if it was a scheduled flight (in the sense that it was publicly noted that an SR-71 was going to be flying) my dad would wake my brother and I up so we could climb on the roof and watch them take off.

11 Likes

I worked on the transport management for the 1988 Bicentennial Airshow at Richmond Air Force base in Sydney. At the end of a long day I was standing at the bus ranks near the upwind end of the runway as the sun was going down, getting the last of the crowds on the buses.

With no warning, two F111s took off over our heads with afterburners on, heading back to (I guess) Williamstown. The sound, the heat, was heartstopping. The whole crowd sort of hunched down and no-one could speak or function for probably 10 seconds - I could feel the sound passing through my chest.

I had some insight into what it must feel like to be under air attack and how disorienting it must be and how difficult it would be to mount any kind of organised defence.

As they climbed away there were a lot of wows and oh my gods and nervous laughter. I watched them climb away with the burners on until they were like two stars. Still absolutely fresh in my memory.

8 Likes

Ooooh my story is living by RAF brize norton.

We had hercules. Tristar and VC10.

Hercs were fine.

Tristar and vc10 were loud.

Tristar was pretty loud… VC10 stopped all TV watching and conversation for at least 2 minutes.

Picture sleeping soundly… A roar rises (takeoff) you don’t hear this… But your slumber is disturbed by a rising rate screeching and howling that increases until the windows are rattling and even the bedclothes are shaking!

VC10’s were frickin LOUD!

(sidenote = when I was about 4 I woke up scared to death as usual and said to my dad ‘what is it’ he replied ‘it’s fine just a dragon. It’ ll fly off when it’s found some food’ well I didn’t sleep for about 3 straight terrified nights. Git)

6 Likes

Apparently this happened…

3 Likes

“She seemed absolutely fine before takeoff but then strangely very drunk or drugged as we took off.” … Mild hypoxia as the cabin altitude increased, or a typically shameful display of English drinking culture? Hmmmm :thinking:

1 Like

Another fine display from a drunk idiot who just ruined her own life.
Anyone who shouts “f***ing come on then” on a flight with kids on it should be banned from flight entirely. Let alone rushing the cockpit. God I hate some people

It does take a bit for alcohol to intoxicate- if she started drinking after the check in…

Considering her size I am surprised it took six passengers to subdue her.

Wheels

I was thinking that … But I suppose enough alcohol can do strange things …

2 Likes

Alcohol induced hyper-dynamism is quite a force to be reckoned with. I am not sure what studies there are on it, but I saw it in action on a couple of occasions in (coincidentally) England. It is not pretty. The experience gained me a healthy, life long respect for alcohol.

I had not looked up the story on the scrambling of the Typhoons. I was a bit surprised, actually, when I saw the reason.