Watching the ISS stream and some EVA in progress

That must take some bandwidth.

Looks like he was working on the RMS (Canadarm) for a little while, but seems to have docked the camera and headed back to the barn. I think that Soyuz is undocking this evening.

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NASA feed. Soyuz landing in Kazakhstan tonight a little time after 2100 EST.

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I think I read that from about 2016 when it was upgraded, the ISS has about 600 Mbps bandwidth.

I recently read ‘Endurance’ the autobiography of Scott Kelly (the twin, who spent over a year on the ISS):

He mentioned that his laptops and iPads on the station wifi were really important parts of his long-term stay, i.e. skype video calls. emails to family etc.

One surprising thing is that the Russian side is quite separate, leading to the joke that the ISS is basically two space stations flying in close formation. Maybe the Russian’s don’t share their wifi passwords. :slight_smile:

PS The book was ‘ok’, in that great insights into the ISS but could have done without the bits that went into why his first wife wasn’t as cool as his second one etc.

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If it’s available on Audible, it might make for good background audio for when I spend time in the Oculus/NASA ISS.

Yes it is:

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Like with any autobiography, the really good parts are when he details his job. The differences between the US/Russian space program, the way he handled the duration of his mission, his hatred of that CO2 exchanger not working :slight_smile: and even some of his Tomcat flying experience is all great stuff and worth the read/listen.

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The Soyuz made a successful return, landing at 2131 Kazakhstan, bringing home NASA astronauts Joe Acaba and Mark Vande Hei and cosmonaut commander Alexander Misurkin of the Russian space agency Roscosmos. Lots of Mi-8 activity.

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This tour of the ISS is very thorough, and at 19:28 she moves to the Russian section. No passport needed :slight_smile: .

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Damn you man. I’m supposed to be doing work. Now I’m embarked on 29 minutes of Space Station documentary. I’m at the pooping part. I learned a lot.

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Yep, I think they leave the doors open.

The book talked about how the chain of command, the systems voltages(!), the food, the potable water, the radio frequencies, even the emergency procedures are different and separate between the Russian and International crew’s and modules. They are of course very friendly, and meet up to share meals once a week, plus ‘trade’ things like water between ‘sides’ if needed, but it was a separation to the degree I was surprised at on something called the International Space Station.

The other main difference was that NASA and the Russian’s often didn’t share the same approach to risk. The Russian cosmonauts would get their pay docked for ‘mistakes’ if acting on their own, so tended to work quite differently with the ground control.

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Yeah, earlier in the video, I thought that the sleeping compartments very interesting. Almost like those cocoon hotels. Fascinating video. Going to go under the Oculus “hood” right now and check out the ISS, to see how it compares with the video.

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Damn…the descent module gives me nightmares. I would seriously be freaking out a bit in that tiny space once they close the hatch and send you on your way.

What an interesting video. What a mess of cables, electronics, and rigging. I’m actually surprised the whole thing is as open between modules as it is. You’d think they’d want doors here and there to be closed off…but I guess it hasn’t been a problem.

Great video…I watched the whole thing…

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Yep, that looks terrifying, but what a ride down.

The only deaths in space (as in decompression in a vacuum) came with Soyuz 11, which is of no comfort. :expressionless:

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That Russian control panel for it looks like one big mystery to me. Never push a dusty button probably applies there too. Do they reuse the Soyuz capsules?

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Nope, but then they don’t spend a lot of money making them. :slight_smile: All mainly ground controlled (the Russian way) plus heavy industrial design that hasn’t changed much since the 60’s. It works though.

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I took a spin in Mission ISS (free), one of the more interesting, interactive, and educational titles in the Oculus library.

Chris’ favorite room.

If you push the left palm (menu) button, there is a handy tablet with map.

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It’s a beauty. How’s your stomach? I felt a bit queasy after using it for a while. :face_vomiting: :slight_smile:

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Yeah, my head felt a little off kilter. Not queasy, just like my head wanted to rotate for a while. Still, I could spend hours in that thing. The problem is that since I can’t put weight on my left foot for another couple of weeks, I have to sit in a chair while exploring. Less than optimal. Mission ISS begs you to pull yourself around.

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Yep, it’s a real interesting locomotion method. I think the jetpack thing is my hurl trigger. :slight_smile:

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The yaw axis always seems to be the worst. Like if I’m playing AirCar or something…that yaw is killer. Oddly enough, it doesn’t bother me in helicopters though. Like my brain has bridged that disconnect for that function specifically.

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I’ve only had a body rush once, while yanking and banking in the Gazelle over Las Vegas. This got me thinking that I wonder if Mission:ISS was also created as a NASA training sim for crew.