An easier way to land?

I personally use this in real-life flying and in the Sim. Different to how I originally learnt. What do you think? Cheers.

https://www.jacobsonflare.com

1 Like

Please do not think you have to but the App - just read this:

2 Likes

Well… You can obviously teach a computer to land a plane. So the geometry of a landing can be solved mathematically. When a human pilot lands manually, s/he will have to learn the cues and act accordingly. Learning where to look and time your response is important. And learning how to time a perfect flare in calm winds is something entirely different from doing so in gusty conditions and a max demo x-wind, where the flare is more or less omitted.
I think it’s like teaching someone how to hit a nail with a hammer. I can tell you how to hold the hammer and what part should hit the nail and how hard. But you will need to teach yourself how make your arm and body move, in order to get that hammer to drive that nail in. You will still bend a few nails, even if you think you’re swinging that hammer exactly the same way, everytime.
Now, don’t get me wrong. Using methods like this can really help people to learn and as such they are great tools.

3 Likes

But how many nails have you bent? enquiring minds want to know :face_with_monocle:

2 Likes

I log my flights, not my nails… :wink:

4 Likes

Could nail bender become a new mudspike title?

1 Like

2 Likes

Personally I just use the Force… so far, so good :wink: .

6 Likes

Donovan Batiste will teach how to land in 1 minute or less

No Flap Landing

Short Approach

Aaaayyyyyyyyyyyyy

4 Likes

From the website: “Safe. Sure. Simple. Affordable.”

Affordable?

2 Likes

Interesting. All the above works for golf too. At least sometimes :slight_smile:

2 Likes

Hammer.
Golf club.
Only difference is the length of the handle.
:wink:

3 Likes

Well, I usually find it much easier to find the nails after a hitting strike. :golfing_man: :sunglasses:

1 Like

There is no technique that works consistently. Think of the many thousands of landings we’ve made and seen. Every one of us has been both hero and louse. Autoland is the same. Usually it’s pretty good because the weather conditions that create fog tend to be the same conditions that are conducive to easily managed touchdowns. The variables are just so innumerable. That is the joy of it all. It’s why we can do this for a thousand years and it will still be fun and exciting. If there really was a “secret” the passion would end.

Even helicopters offer this same challenge. You’d think that in a hover it would be simple. It is easier. But that last 6 inches requires all the nuance and skill that an airplane doing 160knots requires. And sometimes just when you think you’ve got it nailed, a little gust hits at exactly the wrong instant and your hero status vanishes in a poof.

7 Likes

sometimes-i-wonder-if-my-bad-landing-is-still-thinking-about-me

9 Likes

Still my favorite landing meme:

9 Likes

I only fly toys compared to you guys but I still swagger back to the clubhouse when I grease it and slink away to “Fix something urgent” in the hanger when I slam it home and “arrive” rather than land

5 Likes

Same here. I’ve no idea how close DCS is to the real thing but a big draw to me is that I feel I have to have at least some skillz (Me vs the Flight Model = good). Rather than just point the thing at the numbers and wait for an algorithm to say, “gotcha”.

Seems the intricacies of the flight model come out even more when I make hamburger out of it…

Was taking off with my AI wingman yesterday. Waited for him to catch up as I taxied on to the primary - so I didn’t have to wait in the air too long. Whelp, when ‘it’ sniffed the runway he called “Rolling”.

It surprised me so I decided to give him his half and, well, next thing I know we’re getting a wee bit too close. My reaction set off some…errr…what to call it?..lateral PIO: Rudder pedals going both directions. I felt like I could finesse my way out of it (I did, barely). In the Real World I’d have been given a big ‘Down’ mark for even attempting this I’m sure. Thank goodness I’m not a real pilot :slight_smile:

“Finesse” being the the key word relating to the flight modeling.

3 Likes

So much interesting discussion and humour, thanks everyone. As the OP I should say that my main take-away from the Jacobson flare was elevator for aiming spot control and throttle for speed control. I was taught the opposite. Combined with the well-known eyes at the end of the runway during the final flare/hold off (rather than on the runway immediately ahead) I find the new way to be more intuitive and to help me alot with landings in real life and in the Sim. I even use a non-permanent pen to make a tiny mark on the windscreen at eye level to hold on the aiming point (not in the Sim!). But even this does not guarantee a perfect landing every time of course, and everyone has different techniques and preferences. Cheers all, and happy and safe holidays coming up! I only joined Mudspike recently and it’s been great!

6 Likes

Before I bought the Pitts I drove down to a well known Pitts instructor who taught a slight side-slip to see past the nose (in a Pitts the 45 arc at 12 o’clock is blind), use pitch for 100mph and throttle for sink. I hated it. Ugly. Too complicated. I then flew to AZ to a more well-known instructor and he said (but more colorfully) "to heck with that! Idle on downwind, slip like he… …heck and use your left and right peripheral vision to gauge the flare. Worked great! Much easier dealing with just pitch. Plus the technique was safer. Should the motor quit anywhere from crosswind to taxi-off, I was safe. In a Cessna, the Pitts technique would be sporting. Even similar types require slightly different techniques. Landing a 767-400 like a 767-300 will earn nothing but derision from your crew and passengers. The -400 requires the throttles to be reduced very slowly so that idle is timed with touchdown and the flare is more aggressive. Anyway, stick with what works!

11 Likes
© 2021 Mudspike.com | Articles Website | Forums Rules & FAQ