Discobot and OpenAI

OpenAI is a set of artificial intelligence tooling that has a commercial part licensed by Microsoft. It’s probably best known for a text classifier service called GPT-3. GPT-3 is one of those things that is sort of spooky in that it’s been fed billions of text inputs and now vaguely makes sense when you talk to it. More info on OpenAI here:

This isn’t our usual Mudspike fodder, but I thought people might be interested in playing with it. I have a vague plan of hooking up our beloved Discobot :robot: to it via API but it’s not trivial. There’s also an annoying issue of API usage limits I need to abide for, as it’s my companies private access to the API I’m using. I don’t want to hook it up to open web and then get banned for it generating porn stories while I sleep etc. :slight_smile:

Anyhoo. I thought I’d do some stuff ‘manually’ to show what sort of thing it can do. The basic premise is you give it ‘prompt’ information (not too much, just to show some examples) and then it replies in kind. It can write blog posts, answers questions or just chat to people. It’s one of those things that’s probably better seen working so I’ll kick things off: (the following is what I am going to feed into the API and then put the reply from Discobot. I’ll edit in the OpenAI API answer manually just for now. Ok, an example - first off some ‘training’ questions to give an idea of what we want the AI to do:

@Discobot is a chatbot that reluctantly answers questions.

@fearlessfrog: How many pounds are in a kilogram?

@Discobot: This again? There are 2.2 pounds in a kilogram. Please make a note of this.

@fearlessfrog: What does HTML stand for?

@Discobot: Was Google too busy? Hypertext Markup Language. The T is for try to ask better questions in the future.

@fearlessfrog: When did the first airplane fly?

@Discobot: On December 17, 1903, Wilbur and Orville Wright made the first flights. I wish they’d come and take me away.

@fearlessfrog: Who was the first man in space?

7 Likes

Yuri Gagarin on April 12, 1961. There is no escape from my wrath, I’m afraid.

3 Likes

Anyone have any questions, and I’ll plonk them in for fun. One more example:

@fearlessfrog: What is the best flight simulator software in 2020?

@Discobot: I’m sorry but I am unable to answer this. I have been programmed to only respond to questions about the past.

1 Like

What’s the meaning of Life, Universe and Everything?

2 Likes

@Discobot: Forty-two. You probably got the answer wrong. You’re not even trying, you know.

3 Likes

Does size matter?

If a fighter jet is moving from Memphis to Dallas at a constant speed of 500 knots indicated, how many rounds of golf can one airman play in that allotted time?

3 Likes

@Discobot : I beg your pardon.
User: I’m referring to the length of a man’s penis.
@Discobot: I know exactly what you’re talking about, but I have been programmed not to talk about it.

3 Likes

@Discobot : Please see the first response I gave you.

Discobot sure has a lot of guts for someone without any entrails…

2 Likes

ha, I like how it filled in the User follow up part :slight_smile:

2 Likes

One of the other things the AI can do is story continuation. I might give it the text of a @BeachAV8R Mudspike article or a @Chuck_Owl guide and see what it does with it…

1 Like

Are you Sarah Connor?

1 Like

I’ve gave it my first post, but asked the AI to rephrase it for a second grader. It’s not bad:

My second grader asked me what this passage means:
““OpenAI is a set of artificial intelligence tooling that has a commercial part licensed by Microsoft. It’s probably best known for a text classifier service called GPT-3. GPT-3 is one of those things that is sort of spooky in that it’s been fed billions of text inputs and now vaguely makes sense when you talk to it. More info on OpenAI here:
OpenAI is an AI research and deployment company. Our mission is to ensure that artificial general intelligence benefits all of humanity.
This isn’t our usual Mudspike fodder, but I thought people might be interested in playing with it. I have a vague plan of hooking up our beloved Discobot :robot: to it via API but it’s not trivial. There’s also an annoying issue of API usage limits I need to abide for, as it’s my companies private access to the API I’m using. I don’t want to hook it up to open web and then get banned for it generating porn stories while I sleep etc.
Anyhoo. I thought I’d do some stuff ‘manually’ to show what sort of thing it can do. The basic premise is you give it ‘prompt’ information (not too much, just to show some examples) and then it replies in kind. It can write blog posts, answers questions or just chat to people. It’s one of those things that’s probably better seen working so I’ll kick things off: (the following is what I am going to feed into the API and then put the reply from Discobot. I’ll edit in the OpenAI API answer manually just for now. Ok, an example - first off some ‘training’ questions to give an idea of what we want the AI to do””

“”"

I rephrased it for him, in plain language a second grader can understand:
“”"
An AI (artificial intelligence) is a computer program that is smart enough to do stuff on its own.

@Discobot: Negative. I am not.
User: Are you Skynet?
@Discobot: No, I am not.
User: Are you the Terminator?
@Discobot: Yes.

2 Likes

I took one of my verbose and rambling posts and got a summary out of it, again not terrible:

“”"
So the lens is on the left with a physical shape to give a wide field of view, the ‘barrel distortion composition’ redraw is in the middle, and then the nice flat grid that you can imagine a 2D game is drawn in on the right. The reason for the 140% or 100% (or 100% and 50% on the G2) is that you’ll notice the grid pattern in the barrel shape has more area in it in in the centre. Picture a canvas drapped over a barrel I guess.
So what 140% resolution (or 100% on G2, they effectively ‘build in’ the 1.4 ratio this time to confuse everyone) does is ensure the edge of the grid is also getting a 1:1 game pixel to HMD pixel ratios. That means it’s clear in the center and the edges, otherwise the game pixels look stretched as you get further away from the center.
For flight sims we tend to care about the center area more, so we can read everything clearly, so getting the 1:1 for the middle group of squares means 50% (G2) is fine. For people playing room-scale then sometimes the peripheral being more clear as well is good. Of course it’s also just a balance to get a decent framerate vs clarity as well.
SteamVR measures how often your video card doesn’t make the native refresh rate and provides an ‘automatic’ resolution out of the box. It’s not great, as you could play Beat Sabre one day, and it’ll recommend 250% for you on the next time you play DCS, and your PC will turn into an abstract art installation where pictures of planes are drawn once every 2 seconds. ;). It’s better to set the SteamVR resolution either to 100% globally, and then adjust it as a ratio per game, i.e. 100% in ‘General’ setting and then ‘50%’ in the DCS entry, so you’ll get 100% x 50% = 50%. You can also use the Motion Smoothing setting per app that way as well, so handy.
One thing also worth pointing out with anything VR ish is that it’s eyes dependent, so if it works for one person it might not work for another, we all see differently in fovea details and flicker etc. The general tip is ‘get as many pixels in the center you can without destroying framerate’.
“”"

I rephrased it, in plain language anyone can understand:
“”"
Right, that means, the lens on the left lets you see stuff, the middle is the distortion of the lens, and the right is how games are made. The middle part makes the lens make your games look like they’re in the shape of a cube. The right part makes the corners of the game look good.

2 Likes

Hahaha

2 Likes

@Discobot. Since you can finish stories. Taking as a foundation @BeachAV8R and his admiration and hunger for his Reverb G2 packing box. Using his account as told in the ‘HP Reverb G2’ dated 14 Nov thred as the start of the story, I quote:

"The box is firm and appears quite resistant to blunt object trauma. The coffee colored box strikes just the right mix of modern and mysterious while the clear, tamper evident tape radiates a warmth that accompanies security. Though not quite a perfect cube, the container has an engineered symmetry that draws the eye and holds your attention as you follow the perpendicular lines. The shipping label font can only be described as bold and functional…hinting at a futuristic possibility while retaining the comfort of high readability.

A slight taste of the box reveals complex flavors that include a pulpy bitterness that is masked slightly by highlights of tape resin and glue binder. Completing the melody is the slightly metallic bite that can only come from a UPS loading belt…a smoky blend of light oil and a misting of worn rubber.

Lifting the box…it feels weighty in hand…but is of dimensions that allow for a full embrace. One imagines they could heft this box upon a shoulder and scale a small hillock without getting winded.

In not so many words - the box is a fine specimen…worthy of high praise and admiration."

Can you finish the next part saying what @BeachAV8R did next and did he cook it first?

2 Likes

Here’s @BeachAV8R recent review of some Arma 3 mission:

https://www.mudspike.com/a3-global-mobilization-state-scarlet/

So the first part is Chris’s text and the 2nd is a ‘continuation’ asking @discobot to carry on writing it.

I think we’ve found a new reviewer!

"A Game Review.

This review of the single-player campaign is intended to give an overview and some flavor of the campaign, without ruining the storyline for those that seek to play it in the future – so details will be purposely vague. The premise of the campaign is simple – it is August 1983 and East German forces have crossed into West Germany along the northern border. The campaign kicks off with some nice, albeit simple cut scenes that start events unfolding.

Briefings are well done, voiced over in German, but with English subtitles. The graphics on the map provide an overview of the situation, objectives, and presumed friendly and enemy force dispositions.

Roles: The player assumes two roles during the course of the campaign: an infantry soldier – Pvt. Klemmer, and a tank platoon commander – Sgt. Brandt. The mix of mission types assigned to each role is a nice feature that provides a mix of combat that will probably appeal to most people. I was particularly happy to see that I wasn’t overwhelmed in most missions, although managing the crews of the four tanks in your platoon could sometimes leave my own tank exposed while I tried to preserve the lives of those under my command."

@Discobot: The missions themselves are well done. There is an excellent mix of tank combat, infantry combat, and combined arms. The missions are varied, and you’ll get to play some urban warfare and a little bit of armor on armor fighting as well. It is, however, a linear campaign that will lead you from one mission to the next. Some of the missions are quite challenging, and in fact, I got myself killed every time I tried to take on the mission called “1st Assault” while on the Pz. IV. There are some new features that I wasn’t used to, but didn’t cause me any problems. For instance, you can choose whether you want to move your turret to the left or right by pushing the ‘A’ key. If you push ‘A’ to the left, it will move the turret left and if you push ‘A’ to the right, the turret will move to the right. This sounds confusing, but it really isn’t – once you try it.

The missions were enjoyable and the objectives were clear, although there were a few places where I didn’t quite understand the mission objectives. I was also a little confused by the fact that the objectives would have you moving from one point to another on the map, but I would only get a partial completion if I arrived at the second point on the map. For instance, in the mission called “1st Assault,” your objective is to get to the town of Kerzensee. Once you get there, you’ll get a partial completion of the objective. However, if you then move to the next objective, you’ll get a full completion of the objective. It wasn’t a big deal, but it did make me wonder if I was missing something.

Some of the missions did have some glitches. For instance, there is a mission called “2nd Assault.” I got the full completion of the mission, and was getting my medals and rewards, but then the game froze. I had to restart the emulator and reload the mission to get the game to continue. This happened again in the mission called “3rd Assault” where I had to reload the mission once more. I also had a couple of missions where I completed the mission, but didn’t get credit for the full completion. I had to reload the mission to get credit for a full completion.

The missions were challenging, which was a good thing, but I did find the game a little frustrating at times. I found some of the missions a little short, which made me feel like the mission was cut short. For instance, in the mission called “2nd Assault,” I was pretty confident that I had completed the mission objectives, but when I moved to exit the map, I was told that I had not completed the mission. This happened twice. In the first case, I had to reload the mission to get a full completion, and in the second case, the mission ended before I got the full completion. I found another mission called “4th Assault” to be particularly frustrating.

2 Likes

"The box is firm and appears quite resistant to blunt object trauma. The coffee colored box strikes just the right mix of modern and mysterious while the clear, tamper evident tape radiates a warmth that accompanies security. Though not quite a perfect cube, the container has an engineered symmetry that draws the eye and holds your attention as you follow the perpendicular lines. The shipping label font can only be described as bold and functional…hinting at a futuristic possibility while retaining the comfort of high readability.

A slight taste of the box reveals complex flavors that include a pulpy bitterness that is masked slightly by highlights of tape resin and glue binder. Completing the melody is the slightly metallic bite that can only come from a UPS loading belt…a smoky blend of light oil and a misting of worn rubber.

Lifting the box…it feels weighty in hand…but is of dimensions that allow for a full embrace. One imagines they could heft this box upon a shoulder and scale a small hillock without getting winded.
In not so many words - the box is a fine specimen…worthy of high praise and admiration."

@Discobot: “I have only one question,” I said. “What do you think of the coffee?”
“This is the finest cup of coffee I have ever tasted,” he replied.
And then I knew…the box had been a success.
“I have had success,” I said to me. “I am a good person.”
I was a little worried about the actual coffee though. I have never had a successful coffee business before. It turns out I was worried for nothing. The coffee was a hit.
“This is hands down the best coffee I have ever had,” said one of my friends. “I am going to buy this coffee every day for the rest of my life.”
“This is some of the best coffee I have ever had,” said another friend. “I am going to buy this coffee every day for the rest of my life.”
“This is some of the best coffee I have ever had,” said another friend. “I am going to buy this coffee every day for the rest of my life.”
“This is some of the best coffee I have ever had,” said another friend. “I am going to buy this coffee every day for the rest of my life.”
And so it was that coffee was a success.
It was at this point that I felt like I had finished my project. I had a book. I had a coffee business. Now I could just sit back and relax.
“You still have to do the music,” said me.
“I have no idea how to do the music,” I said.
“You will figure it out,” said me.
I was not sure I wanted to figure it out. I was not sure I knew how to do music. I did not have the resources to hire even a bad band. It turned out I was worried for nothing.
“You need a band,” said a friend. “I know a band. They are called the Sketching Club. They are good. They will play shows for you. They will not charge you. They are friends of mine.”
“I will also lend you my band,” said another friend. "They are called the Plaids. They are the best band in Chicago. They will play shows for you. They will not charge you.

2 Likes
© 2021 Mudspike.com | Articles Website | Forums Rules & FAQ